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Surgical Care

Hospitals can improve surgical care and reduce the risk of wound infection after surgery by providing the right medicines at the right time on the day of surgery.

There are steps that you, as a patient, can take to make sure the surgery is as safe as possible. For example, your doctor or nurse can tell you how to wash with an antibiotic soap the day before surgery. You can give your doctor or nurse a list of all your medications, including vitamins, herbal medicines, and over-the-counter medications. You should also tell your doctor or nurse about any allergies and bad reactions to anesthesia.

Sometimes patients get an infection after surgery, even if the hospital took steps to prevent it. Here are signs to look out for:

  • The surgical wound is red, hot, and swollen.
  • You have a fever of over 100 degrees after you go home.
  • A smelly or yellow/green fluid is coming out of the wound.
  • Your pain is increasing even though you are taking pain medication.

How is EJGH Performing in Surgical Care?

The individual measures below are how hospitals throughout the United States are measured. Click on a link to see how EJGH compares nationally and in Louisiana in each individual measure.

Percent of patients who got treatment at the right time (within 24 hours before or after their surgery) to help prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery

Percent of surgery patients whose doctors ordered treatments to prevent blood clots after certain types of surgeries

Percent of surgery patients who were given the right kind of antibiotic to help prevent infection

Percent of surgery patients whose preventive antibiotics were stopped at the right time (within 24 hours after surgery)

Percent of all heart surgery patients whose blood sugar (blood glucose) is kept under good control in the days right after surgery

Percent of surgery patients who were given an antibiotic at the right time (within one hour before surgery) to help prevent infection

Percent of surgery patients who were taking heart drugs called beta blockers before coming to the hospital, who were kept on the beta blockers during the period just before and after their surgery

Percent of patients with urinary catheter removals POD1 or POD2 with a Day of Surgery being Day Zero

Percent of surgery outpatients who were given the right kind of antibiotic to help prevent infection

Percent of surgery outpatients who were given an antibiotic within 1 hour prior to surgery incision

Percent of patients having surgery who were actively warmed in the operating room or whose body temperature was near normal by the end of surgery

All descriptions and data sources are reported from Hospital Compare.

Data reported are based on discharges from 4th Quarter 2011 through 3rd Quarter 2012
 

 

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